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Bezrogov Vitaly; Tendryakova Maria

«Gab ihnen der liebe Gott...», or God and nature in German and Russian textbooks of the late 18th and early 19th century


Bezrogov Vitaly, Tendryakova Maria (2018) "«Gab ihnen der liebe Gott...», or God and nature in German and Russian textbooks of the late 18th and early 19th century ", Vestnik Pravoslavnogo Sviato-Tikhonovskogo gumanitarnogo universiteta. Seriia IV : Pedagogika. Psihologiia, 2018, vol. 48, pp. 19-48 (in Russian).

DOI of the paper: 10.15382/sturIV201848.19-48

Abstract

In the last third of the 18th and early 19th centuries, religious education within courses in natural history appears to be important evidence that reveals the historical and cultural dialogue between the two pedagogical traditions. This article is based on a study of original and translated textbooks by J. Blumenbach, G. Große, G. Raff , V. Zuev (Russ. В. Зуев), N. Ozeretskovsky (Н. Озерецковский) and V. Severgin (В. Севергин), K. Ushinsky (К. Ушинский). The analysis demonstrates conscious and nonconscious differences in comprehending and explaining the role and place of God with regard to nature and humankind. In translated books (e.g. Naturgeschichte für Kinder by Raff ), we can see three levels of the presence of the Lord in nature (in terms of each living creature, their groups and communities, the cosmos as an interrelated system). In similar Russian books only the fi rst of them is regularly presented, if presented at all. The border between nature and God in Russian books on natural history is drawn more distinctly, the boundary between books about God and about nature is less transparent than in Germany. Such a distinction is eff ected by the features of the dialogue between education and religion, characteristic of these countries.

Keywords

textbook, natural history, religious education, 1700-1799, 1800-1861, Russia, Germany

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Information about the author

Bezrogov Vitaly


Academic Degree: Doctor of Sciences* in Education;
Academic Degree: Candidate of Sciences* in History;
Place of work: Institute for Strategy and Theory of Education of the Russian Academy of Education; 5/16 Makarenko Str., Moscow 105062, Russian Federation;
Post: Senior Research Fellow;
ORCID: 0000-0001-6389-4783;
Email: bezrogov@mail.ru.

*According to the International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) 2011, the degree of Candidate of Sciences (Cand.Sc.) belongs to ISCED level 8 — "doctoral or equivalent", together with PhD, DPhil, D.Lit, D.Sc, LL.D, Doctorate or similar.


Tendryakova Maria


Academic Degree: Candidate of Sciences* in History;
Place of work: Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology of the Russian Academy of Sciences; 32a Leninskii Prospekt, Moscow 119991, Russian Federation;
Post: Senior Research Fellow;
ORCID: 0000-0001-6206-8439;
Email: mashatendryak@gmail.com.

*According to the International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) 2011, the degree of Candidate of Sciences (Cand.Sc.) belongs to ISCED level 8 — "doctoral or equivalent", together with PhD, DPhil, D.Lit, D.Sc, LL.D, Doctorate or similar.

Acknowledgments

The work on the article was supported by the grants 17-06-00066a and 17-06-00288 by the Russian Foundation of the Basic Research (Dept.of the Humanities and Social Sciences).